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State v. Baize

Court of Appeals of Utah

December 12, 2019

State of Utah, Appellee,
v.
Nathan David Baize, Appellant.

          Fourth District Court, American Fork Department The Honorable Roger W. Griffin No. 161100835

          Douglas J. Thompson, Attorney for Appellant

          Sean D. Reyes and Tera J. Peterson, Attorneys for Appellee

          Judge Michele M. Christiansen Forster authored this Opinion, in which Judges Kate Appleby and Jill M. Pohlman concurred.

          CHRISTIANSEN FORSTER, JUDGE

         ¶1 Nathan David Baize appeals his convictions for violating a protective order. We affirm.

         BACKGROUND[1]

         ¶2 Baize and his former wife (Victim) were married in 2010 and divorced in 2014. Victim had sole physical custody of their child and shared joint legal custody with Baize. After enduring several instances of verbal and physical abuse, Victim sought a protective order against Baize. The court issued a protective order after a hearing, at which Baize was present, directing Baize not to "commit, try to commit or threaten to commit any form of violence" against Victim, including "stalking, harassing, threatening, physically hurting, or causing any other form of abuse." Baize was also ordered, "Do not contact, phone, mail, e-mail, or communicate in any way with [Victim], either directly or indirectly," with the exception that Baize could email Victim about their child, provided his communications were "civil in nature."

         ¶3 After the entry of the protective order, Baize sent numerous emails to Victim that were not about their child, not civil in nature, and arguably abusive. Much of the content of the emails was directed toward Victim's qualities and character. Baize sent emails to Victim telling her that she was a "spoiled brat," "lazy," "irresponsible," "vindictive," "selfish," "uncooperative," "incapable," "fake," and lacking "integrity." Baize also sent emails to Victim telling her to "[u]se your brain blondie," to "[k]eep it simple stupid, [Victim's name]," and that he was "sick and tired . . . of [Victim's] blonde, lazy, messed up approach to cooperation." Additionally, on several occasions, Baize threatened to call the police for "custodial interference charges."

         ¶4 On another occasion, Baize emailed Victim-with a copy also sent to Victim's new husband-complaining about Victim and alleging that Victim engaged in certain improprieties during their marriage. Victim's husband spoke to Baize at length and told him that he "need[ed] to stop the belligerent, degrading emails to [Victim]." Baize responded that his emails "will never stop." Furthermore, Baize told Victim that she was "a weak, weak person" because she would "construe [his email comments] as personal attacks."

         ¶5 The content of Baize's emails to Victim prompted the State to charge him with four counts of violating a protective order. See Utah Code Ann. § 76-5-108 (LexisNexis Supp. 2018). These charges were enhanced from misdemeanors to third degree felonies because Baize already had a prior conviction for violating the same protective order. See id. § 77-36-1.1(2)(c) (Supp. 2019) (describing enhanced penalties for violating a protective order). Baize moved to dismiss the charges, arguing that the protective order was an unconstitutional prior restraint of speech and that requiring his emails to be "civil in nature" was unconstitutionally vague. Baize also asked the court to give the jury an instruction defining the terms "harassing," "threatening," and "abuse" in the protective order as "forms of violence or threats of violence." The court denied both motions.

         ¶6 At trial, Baize stated that while the tone in his emails might indicate that he was "[f]rustrated," "feeling dejected," "[h]elpless, hopeless, [and] concerned," the emails were never uncivil. Rather, Baize asserted that he was just being "honest" and "clear." However, Baize also testified that he suspected Victim would be offended by the emails and that Victim was "weak" for reading his emails as insults. Baize also admitted that his emails were similar in tone and content to emails he had sent previously to Victim, which formed the basis of his prior conviction for violating the same protective order. The jury found Baize guilty of three counts of violating a protective order. Baize appeals.

         ISSUES AND STANDARDS OF REVIEW

         ¶7 The first issue on appeal is whether the restriction in the protective order requiring that Baize's communication with Victim be "civil in nature" rendered the order unconstitutionally vague or acted as a prior restraint on speech. "Whether [an order] is constitutional is a question of law that we review for correctness, giving no deference to the trial ...


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